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Femandina 


T ALLAH ASSEE^ 
8LMarks~~'~''-'-^V 
i' LakelCi 


JACKSONVILLE 

^Bittaburg 

INST.AUGUSTINE 


Gainesville 


CAST palatka 

k Esnauola 

Vqrmond 

^dSDAYTONA 

LEW SMYRNA 

■ WAK HILL 


Cedar Keys 


id the West Indies 

Published by the 

FLORIDA EAST COAST 

RAILWAY. 


Hotnos&ssa 


Brooksville 


\vtitusville 

Point 

•k\JJ/Cape Canaveral 

■ROCKLEDGE 

□ LAU GALLIE 
M (MELBOURNE 

YOftSebastian 

oil 

y Fort Pierce* 
*’*u'lJen8cn 


Port T a J 

St.Petersburg 


Pbosphoria 

■'BraidcntioT 

DSarasotaJ 


SCALE OF MILES 


/ Lake 
I Okeech 
Punta ^ j 
Garda Wi 

jjOMyers 


LITTLE ABACO 


Charlotte 

Jiarbor 


165 MILES TO THE INCH 


"West Palm 
Beach 

Naples Lantana) 


GREAT 
ABACO I 


aj Biscajne _ 

fjMj AJW L^BEMINI 

fJ*BI8CATNE 7s".— ' 
$o bat 

r KEY LARGO 


HARBOR KEY 


Cutler 


ELEUTHERA 


Cape C 
Sable 

o*' 


DRY T0RTUGA8 


NASSAU 0 


KEY WEST 


SAN SALVADOR 

or Cat lal. 

{Columbus 1492) 


ANDROS 


ISLANDS 


ELBOW KEY 


WATLING8 


« CONCEPTION^ 


SALT KEY 


GT.EXUMA 


LIT.EXUMA IS 


SAMANA OR 
ATWOOD KEY 


Mantua 


CROOKED 


ACKLIN 


Cruces 
,-v-T^pClara 


FORTUNE I 


GT. RAGGED 


C.San < 

Antonio 


Moron 


Caicos Passage 


N.Gerona 


C.VERDE 


* TO 

ti Guanaga^i 

PRINCIPE 


NORTH C*lC08 
^GRANO LA.COS 

* o EAST 
. CAICOS 


CASTLE I 


PROVIDENCIALES 


Trinidad 


LITTLE INAGUA 


ernando do 
iLNuevitaa 


I. DE PINOS 


J ucaro 


TURKS IS 


Puerto 

Principe 


GREAT 
INAGUA I 


Gilbara 


Santa Cruz 


Mayari 


DE CUBA 


f SANTIAGO , 
Enramada 
Manzanillo 

El Cobre<X 


B. ile Buena 
Lsperanza 


Barracoa 


Pt. dt 

p A8 SA de 


HAYTI OR 
SAN DOMINGO 

IVirttK/VAA^C.Viejo Francaia 


CAYMAN BAR 


Santiago 
de Cuba 


little 

Cayman 


Gonaivcso 


GRAND 

CAYMAN 


C.Samana 


St. Marc 


O Banica 


GONAVE 


M I N I C A .1 

f ba May aco <>* 

S.Cristobal ‘ 

iaO Niirua ®SAn DOMINGO 


Jeremie 


Plymouth 


Aguadill* 


S.Negril Pt. 

JAMAICA 


■hux n 

Tiburou 


VICI08A8 

IB. 


S.Luia Baienet 


ayaguez^j 

^ San Carmen 


Port Maria 

SPANISH 
TOWN , si 


Holland Bay 


Jacmel 


Ponce^^ 

PUERTO 

RICO 


M or ant Pt 


Portland Pt 


Beata Pt 


C. Cameron 


False Cape 


CENTRAL. 

AMERICA 



































































/ 






o 


THE FLORIDA 



COAST HOTEL SYSTEM, 



C . B. KNOTT. General Superintendent. 



. GILLIS <5r> MURRA V HOTEL PONCE DE LEON 
JOS. P. GREAVES . . . HOTEL ALCAZAR 
A. M. TAYLOR . . ST. AUGUSTINE CASINO 

ANDERSON PRICE . . HOTEL ORMOND 


FRED STERRY 

E. A. WATSON 
H. W. MERRILL 


LAND FOR 



(ROYAL P 01 NCI A NA 
I PA LM BE A CH INN 
. PALM BEACH CASINO 
. HOTEL ROYAL PALM 





The Railway Company has large bodies of timber and farming 
at fair prices. For information on this subject, address 


lands which it offers to actual settlers upon easy terms and 

J. E. INGRAHAM, 

LAND COMMISSIONER, ST. ' AUGUSTINE. 


FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY. 





GENERAL OFFICES, ST. AUGUSTINE. 






— MILEAGE. 


Miles. 


Miles. 


Miles. 


Jacksonville. 

South Jacksonville. 

Bowden. 

Nesbitt. 

Greenland. 

Pittsburgh. 

Durbin. 

Woodland. 

Sampson. 

Magnolia Grove... 

J Hotel Ponce de Leon ... 

St. Augustine j Hotel Alcazar . 

( Hotel Cordova . 

Tocoi Junction. 

Tocoi. 


1.2 

4.7 

9.5 

12.8 

15.9 

20.4 

23.1 

27.1 
31.3 


36.4 


39.7 

51.7 


Hurds. 

Middleton. 

Armstrong. .............................. 

Holy Branch. 

Hastings. 

Orange Mills. 

Pattersonville. 

East Palatka. 


44.2 

47.1 
49.0 

51.1 
53.7 

57.4 

58.5 

61.5 


Palatka 


64.1 


San Mateo 


65.5 


Oakside. 

Yelvington... 

Roy. 

Dinner Island 

Neoga. 

Espanola. 

Bunnells. 

Favorita. 

Harwood. 


64.3 

66.6 

68.7 
74.1 

80.3 

82.3 

86.7 
92.6 

96.3 


Tomoka. 

Ormond, Hotel Ormond 

Holly Hill. 

Daytona. 

Blake. 

Port Orange . 

Savage. 

Spruce Creek. 

Turnbull Bay. 

New Smyrna. 

Glencoe. 

Briggsville. 

Indian Spring. 

Rogers. 

Lake Helen. 

Twin Oaks. 

Orange City. 

Orange City Junction .. 

Hawks Park. 

Hucomer. 

Oak Hill. 


Lyrata. 

East Aurantia 
East Mims ... 
Titusville .... 
Pritchards ... 
Hardeeville .. 

Faustina. 

City Point ... 

Cocoa. 

Rockledge ... 
Bonaventure . 

Pineda. 

Eau Gallie ... 
Melbourne ... 


101.4 

104.7 
107.0 

109.7 

112.5 

114.7 
116.1 

119.3 

121.3 

124.6 


127.7 

131.7 
134.4 
140.0 

145.1 
148.6 

150.1 
152.0 


127.1 
130.9 

136.4 

143.1 

145.4 

150.4 

154.4 

157.6 

165.4 

167.7 

169.3 

173.1 

175.4 
179.3 

182.7 

189.8 

194.2 


Malabar. 

Micco. 

Sebastian. 

Woodlej. 

Gifford. 

St. Lucie. 

Fort Pierce. 

Ankona. 

Eden. 

Jensen. 

Stuart. 

Alicia. 

Hobe Sound. 

West Jupiter .... 

Riviera . 

West Palm Beach 


199.9 \ 
208.6 

214.5 
221.8 

225.3 

238.6 

241.5 
249.0 

254.4 

256.7 

260.6 
266.6 
276.6 

282.8 
295.3 

299.5 9 


Royal Poinciana .. 

Palm Beach Inn. 

Lantana. 

Hypoluxo. 

Linton. 

Boca Ratone. 

Hillsboro. 

Progresso. 

Fort Lauderdale. 

Modelo.. 

Biscayne. 

Lemon City. 

Buena Vista. 

Miami, Hotel Royal Palm . 

Nassau, by Florida East Coast Steamship. 
Key West, by Key West & Miami Steam¬ 
ship. 


300.0 

300.4 

308.4 

309.4 

316.8 

323.9 

326.9 

339.5 
341.0 

345.1 
358.3 
361.8 

363.2 
366.0 
509.0 


521.0 



Connection at MIAMI 



with steamers of the Key West & Miami Steamship Co. to and from Key West, 
with steamers of the Florida East Coast Steamship Co. for Nassau, N.P. 

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f 




FLORIDA .*. 

Discovered April 3, 1512, by Juan Ponce de Leon, a 
Spaniard. Transferred to England in 1763. Re¬ 
ceded to Spain in 1783. Sold to the United States 
in 1821. 


ST. AUGUSTINE 

The Seloy of the Indians, the St. Augustin of the 
Spaniards, the St. Augustine of the English, and now 
during January, February and March, yearly, the cen¬ 
tre of American Social Life, was permanently settled 
September 8, 1565, by Don Pedro Menendez de 
Aviles. 


Points of Interest and Attractions .*. 

♦ 

The Spanish-Moresque Palaces : Hotel Ponce de 
Leon, Hotel Alcazar, Hotel Cordova. The 

Casino, with its Russian and Turkish Baths, its im¬ 
mense Swimming Pool, Ball Room, Entertainment 
Halls and Theatre, Bowling Alleys, Billiard Rooms, 
Lawn Tennis Courts, Bicycle Riding Academy. The 
Artists’ Studios — Friday Evening Receptions. The 
Old Spanish Fort, begun in 1565 as San Juan de Pinos 
by the first negro slaves brought to America, finished 
as Fort San Marco in 1756, and changed to Fort 
Marion 1825. The Sea Wall begun in 1690, finished 
in 1843. The Old Cathedral built in 1791-3; par¬ 
tially burned and rebuilt 1887. City Gates. Plaza, 
containing the Confederate Monument, the Old Slave 
Market, and the only monument extant commemo- 
rating the New Spanish Constitution of 1812. Old 
Portion of City — Narrow Streets and Overhanging 
Balconies. St. Francis Barracks, formerly a Monas¬ 
tery, now occupied by the First Artillery, U.S.A.— 
Dress Parades — Guard Mounts — Concerts by the 
Military Band. Oldest House — St. Francis Street, 
opposite Barracks. Post-Office building, formerly 
residence of Spanish Governor. St. Augustine Golf 
Club — Season December 1st to May 1st. 


Winter Cottages .\ .-. .*. 

The Ponce de Leon Cottages, beautifully located and 
of different sizes, for rent for the winter season: 
October to May or June. 

Stores .\ 

For rent in the Alcazar and Cordova by the year or 


for the season. 

Drives and Bicycle 

About the City. 

Garnett’s Orange Grove. 

Magnolia Grove. 

Moultrie Road. 

Pine Barrens. 

New Cemetery. 

Four Mile Swamp. 

Palatka Road. 

Hansom’s Swamp and 
Sugar Mill Ruins. 

Ruins of old Spanish 
Light House. 

New U. S. Light House. 

Coquina Quarries. 

Old Cemeteries .-. 

Near City Gates. 

Near St. Francis Barracks 


Roads .•. .•. .•. 

Around the Horn. 

Hildreth’s Orange Grove. 

Jessamine Swamp. 

Moultrie and Grape Vine¬ 
yards. 

Race Track. 

Picolata Road. 

Ponce de Leon Spring. 

Buena Esparanza. 

To St. Anastatia Island 
over the new bridge. 

Great South Beach, Bath¬ 
ing, Hard and Smooth 
for Bicycle Riding and 
Driving. 


On Cordova Street. 


Churches 

Memorial, Presbyterian. Cathedral, Catholic. 

Grace, Methodist. Trinity, Episcopal. 

Baptist. 


Sails (BOATS ALONG SEA WALL NEAR PLAZA) 

Matanzas River. 

North River. 


Along North Beach (out¬ 
side). 

Fort Matanzas. 

Yacht Race Course. 

Hotel Physicians . 

Dr. Frank Fremont-Smith. 


St. Sebastian River. 

North Beach. 

Light House. 

Bird Island and Bar. 
Matanzas Inlet. 

Moultrie. 

Dr. Andrew Anderson. 


Bicycle Renting Rooms, Riding Academy and Instructors, in connection with St. Augustine Casino. 














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HOTEL PONCE DE LEON, 


Open January to April 


GILLIS & MURRAY, Managers, 


ST. AUGUSTINE 




































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HOTEL ALCAZAR, 


JOS. P. GREAVES, Manager, 


Open November first to May first. 


ST. AUGUSTINE 


\ 

































































































































































I 







HOTEL CORDOVA, St. Augustine. 


Rooms only. 


Open during February and March. 


* 



St. Augustine Casino, Swimming Pool, also Dance and Entertainment Hall,Theatre, Russian and Turkish Baths,Tennis, Bowling, Bicycles. 





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Bicycle Riding Academy and St. Augustine Casino Tennis Court. 









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Jno. Masters, still a familiar figure in 
St. Augustine, and who was one of the 
captors of Oceola, standing on the spot 
where that famous Seminole chief was 
taken October 21st, 1837. 






South Beach, St. Anastatia Island, reached by bridge across the Matanzas River. 






























































cV^ap of the 

fSty^iKjusliives 

O)liowinq location of th 

PONCEdeLEON 
ALCAZAR 

CORDOVA 
CASINO 




































































Ormond on the Halifax. 


9 

POINTS OF INTEREST AND 

ATTRACTIONS. 

“Yet when I went to another resort, and saw a green 
and white country hotel in a shady grove beside a cool 
river, and observed the men and women in the refreshing 
undress of flannels and soft hats, I confess that my heart 
went out to the old, old joy of country rest and quiet 
and unconcern. . 

* 4 * 

“ The most extended vibration of the restless mass of 
winter travellers in Florida is up and down the Indian 
River. The starting point for this journey is Ormond 
on the Halifax, and in all Florida I saw nothing more 
picturesque or alluring than the hotel and its surround¬ 
ings at that place. Ten minutes before Ormond is 
reached the scenery changes with startling suddenness, 
and the piny woods end and the palmetto groves begin, 
as if nature had drawn an invisible and narrow line be- 
tween the temperate and the tropic zones at right angles 
across the railroad track .”—'Julian Ralph, in Harper’s 
Magazine. 



THE ROADS AND BICYCLE PATHS. 

There are long drives and short drives ; drives of two 
or twenty miles on the smooth, hard sea beach; drives 
through the golden groves of orange; drives through 
dense tropical forests to Spanish ruins; drives to ancient 
causeways built by the slaves of planters long ago, and 
drives to the plantations of hospitable settlers whose 
places are replete with the beauty and interest of South¬ 
ern fruits and flowers. Most of these drives are upon 
smooth, hard roads, roads that are a pleasure to wheel 
over. Ormond is justly celebrated for its drives. Early 
and late in the season the Ormond livery makes reduced 
rates for driving. 


THE TOMOKA. 

W 

The Tomoka Cabin is the rendezvous for fishing and 
picnic parties, and is reached by a lovely drive of four 
miles through the “ Hammock ” and pine woods, or by 
a sail in the launch, six miles up the Halifax and nine 
miles up the Tomoka. The Tomoka Trip is one of 
Florida’s most interesting attractions, and has the ad» 
vantage of consuming very little of either time or money. 


WINTER COTTAGES. 

Cottage life at Ormond is destined to become very 
popular. Pleasant sites along the river front are obtained, 
many of them with a piece of old bearing orange grove 
attached, a pretty cottage is built, meals are obtained at 
the hotel, and thus, without the care of housekeeping, 
families can have the room and comfort and freedom of 
their own house, and enjoy without restraint or annoy¬ 
ance the pleasures of their Southern winter home. 


THE DRIVES AND BICYCLE PATHS OF 

ORMOND, WHICH ARE ITS 

SPECIAL FEATURE. 

Arouiyi the Square, Halifax- 
River and Ocean Beach, 
five miles. 

The Hammock Drive to 
Old Chimneys, five miles. 

The Hammock and Glen- 
Ellen, eight miles. 

Number Nine, River Road 
and Beach, seven miles 
each way. 

Daytona, by the River and 
Beach, seven miles each 
way. 


Causeway Drive (finest 
drive in the South), ten 
miles. 

Tomoka Settlement, Pine 
Woods Drive, six miles 
each way. 

Mt. Oswald, a Forest Drive, 
six miles each way. 

Smyrna Inlet and the Fish¬ 
ing Grounds, sixteen 
miles each way, on the 
Ocean Beach. 




BICYCLE RENTING ROOMS, RIDING ACADEMY AND INSTRUCTORS. 








& 






* 





Open January 11 to April. 



HOTEL ORMOND, 


The Hotel from Ormond Bridge. 
The Fishermen’s Promenade. 


ANDERSON & PRICE, Managers, 


ORMOND 

































































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Hotel Ormond, Approach. 






The River Drive, Ormond. 











































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The Bostrom Walk, from Ormond Hotel. 




















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The River Drive, Ormond. 








































































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The Tomoka River, from Tomoka Cabin 


near Ormond 







♦ 















One of the Hammock Drives and Bicycle Roads, Ormond 
























The Ormond Run of the Bicycle Club. 


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Ormond Beach for Driving and Bicycling. As hard and smooth as Asphalt. 



















































LAKE WORTH AND PALM BEACH. 

SAILS. 

On Lake Worth, North and South. Pitts Island. 
To the Inlet. To Lantana. Down the Canal. On the 

4 

Ocean, from the Beach. On the Ocean, from the Lake 

through the Inlet. 

■ 

FISHING. 

Up and down the Lake for Bluefish. Shark Fishing 
outside. For Kingfish outside. For Bass from the 
Beach. Deep Sea Fishing from the Ocean Pier at 
the Beach. 


BATHING. 

0 

In the Great Salt Water Swimming Pool. In the 
Surf at the Beach at all times. 

% J 

WALKS AND BICYCLE PATHS. 

« • 

To the Rubber Tree, two miles South. 'To the 
Cragin Place (Reve d’£t6), two miles North. To Lake 
Worth Village, one and one half miles North. To the 
Fresh Water Lake, two miles. To the Pineapple Planta¬ 
tions. Along the Shore and through the many Cocoanut 
Shaded Avenues. 

ENTERTAINMENTS. 

#▼ 

Tennis. Gun Club Clay Pigeon Shoots. Royal 
Poinciana Casino, with its Dance and Entertainment 
Hall. 

■ 

Cicycle Renting Rooms, Riding Academy and Instructors. 
Hotel Physician — Dr. Lewis W. Pendleton of Portland, Me. 



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The Orange Blosso: 



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ROYAL POINCIANA, 


FRED STERRY, Manager, 


Open January to April. 


PALM BEACH 


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The Magnolia Flower. 





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Fresh Water Lake, Palm Beach. 



ROYAL POINCIANA, Palm Beach. 










































































PALM BEACH INN, 


Open December to May 


FRED S TERRY, Manager 


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Palm Beach Inn, from the Ocean Pier. 





Ocean Pier, Palm Beach. 






























































Largest Cateh on 

Record 

at Palm Beaeh. 


133 King Fish. 


Weight, 2,102 pounds. 


Caught off Palm Beach. 


Friday, March 29, 1895. 



4 








Salt Water Swimming Pool, Palm Beach. 


















































































































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Avenue from Lake to Ocean. — Royal Poinciana to Palm Beach Inn. 


Traveller’s Tree, Lake Worth. Reached by Bicycle Paths. 


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Midwinter Ocean Bathing, Palm Beach 








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On one of the Bicycle Paths. Cactus Garden (300 varieties), Cragin Place (“ Reve d’ete ”), Lake Worth, Florida. 


















































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Camp of Settler* 

near NEVV RIVER.' 








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Cocoanut Trees, Palm Beach. 


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Pine Apples, Palm Beach, Florida 



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The “Ramble,” Walk or Bicycle Path, Palm Beach, Florida 










































ROYAL 


H. W. MERRILL, Manager, 


PALM 


i 


MIAMI, 


BISCAYNE 


BAY, FLORIDA 


ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 600 GUESTS. 















MISCAYNE BAY is a large sheet of salt water, so clear that its garden-like bottom and numberless variety of fish can 

be plainly seen even to a depth of twenty-five feet and more. It is separated from the ocean by the picturesque 
Florida Keys, some of the larger and most noted of which are 

VIRGINIA KEY. SANDS KEY. ELLIOTT KEY. BISCAYNE KEY. 

KEY LARGO. PALO ALTO KEY. ANGEL FISH KEY. 


-On Biscayne Bay, and surrounding Fort Dallas at the mouth of the Miami River, is the southern 
terminus of the Florida East Coast Railway, which skirts the east coast of Florida from Jacksonville south through 
such world-famous resorts as St. Augustine, Ormond and Palm Beach. 


EXCURSIONS. 


FALLS OF MIAMI RIVER. 

% 

SOUTH FORKS AND EVERGLADES 

LITTLE RIVER. 

ARCH CREEK. 


FOWRY ROCK LIGHT. 

COCOANUT GROVE 


CEASAR’S CREEK. 


JEW FISH CREEK. 


CAPE FLORIDA LIGHT (not now used.) 


KEY WEST BY STEAMER 


SUBMARINE GARDENS, TURTLE HARBOR, BISCAYNE BAY, equal to those at Nassau. 


OPEJ4 AIK BATJ-UJ'IG in the Bay in front of the Royal Palm at all times. 

BOATIJlG A^ID CAl'iOEIJ'lG on the rivers and into the everglades. 
flAPflTHfl LAUNCH and Sail Boat Excursions. 

BICYCLING — Rental rooms in the hotel, Riding Academy and Instructors on hotel grounds. 

BEAUTIFUL WAIil^S and Bicycle Paths. 







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Open January to April. 


HOTEL ROYAL PALM, 


i 


H. W. MERRILL, Manager, 


MIAMI, on Biscayne Bay, Florida 


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Seminole Indians and Canoe on Miami River, as seen from the Hotel Royal Palm. 



Steamer “Biscayne” on Miami River, as seen from the Hotel Royal Palm. 







































































Old Fort Dallas grounds, adjoining those of Hotel Royal Palm. 


* 




Seminole Families. 














































Canoeing on the Miami River. 



Canoeing on Arch Creek. 






















































“ The breath of a celestial clime, 

As if from Heaven’s wide open gates did flow 
Health and refreshment on the world below. ” 

— Bryant . 


T^ASSAU is the Mecca of the tourist, the dream of the invalid, 
* £ the delight of the sportsman. 

Glancing at the map an instant, you will see that it is the 
capital of the Bahama Islands, that it lies just east of Southern 
Florida, and that it is less than 150 miles from either Palm Beach 
or Miami. You will see, also, that the Gulf Stream, that strange 
and forceful river of the ocean, protects it on the west as well 
as on the north from chilling winds, and gives it that wondrous 
climate where, as a matter of fact and record, the thermometer 
ranges during our harsh winter months from 68 to 78 degrees, and 
in twenty-four hours rarely shows a variation of over five degrees. 

Winter, in our sense of the word, is literally unknown, while 
at the same time the islands, even in our summer season, are 
quite exempt from the dry, scorching heat that characterizes other 
tropical countries. 

Nassau has a Hotel, beautifully situated and well managed. 
The Royal Victoria is kept by an American, and has a reputation 
that is world wide. There are smaller hotels and boarding¬ 
houses, so that every class and condition of tourist or invalid 

can be well accommodated. A direct cable, with low rates to the 

% 

United States, makes our country very near at all times. 

There is amusement for everyone, for all tastes and tempera¬ 
ments. The sailing is unsurpassed, both inside the harbor with 
its long landlock stretch to the eastward, or outside on the 
waters of the broad Atlantic. The drives extend for miles along 
the shores, or inland to the pine forests. The roads, made of 
the native stone, are smooth as asphalt, and are the delight 
of the cyclist, for, with the even surface of asphalt they have also 
the spring of the cinder path. As a result, Nassau is in great 
favor with knights of the wheel, and during the last two seasons 
parties by day, and at night under the wondrous moonlight of 
the tropics, have been amongst the most popular amusements of 
the place. The fishing is excellent, both deep sea and in the 
harbor, and the disciple of Nimrod will also find good sport for 
his gun. There is sea bathing every day in the year; in still 
water, or on an ocean beach that is not surpassed anywhere. 


Among the many things that interest the stranger, the sea 
gardens, a short distance from Nassau, are perhaps the most won¬ 
derful. They are briefly described by a well known writer as 
follows: “The subaqueous gardens of the Bahamas are one of 
the most interesting scenes imaginable, and more than fulfil any 
ideas that fancy may create about them. They are really fairy 
gardens, for far down in the clear green water waive brilliant 
sea grass, flowers and vines, while many species of fish, varying in 
hue and size from the green and golden minnows, not two ounces 
in weight, perhaps, to the ponderous Jew fish, clad in a coat of 
silver mail and weighing over 500 pounds, dash through the 
shrubbery or placidly float in a grotto. Conches in which pinkish 
pearls are concealed may also be found there, and with them 
nearly every species of shell fish indigenous to tropical seas.” 

For more than a century Nassau has been the point most 
favored by persons desirous of escaping the severities of a Northern 
winter, but the long sea voyage and consequent discomfort have 
deterred many, who otherwise would have visited and enjoyed 
this land of the Lotus and the Oleander, so aptly termed the Isle 
of June. Now, the Florida East Coast Steamship Line 
brings it within the reach of all, and places the gem spot of the 
tropics but a few short hours’ sail from the Florida shores, a 
brief voyage on a sea that is smooth and landlocked nearly the 
entire trip. Think of it! In what direction or by w r hat other 
means of transportation can such an excursion be made. One 
absolutely new to an American, and yet where our own language is 
spoken, where the hospitality of our English cousin is proverbial, 
and where our customs and manner of living are followed. 

It is an easy journey to Nassau. From the sunset sky of 
Biscayne and Miami to the sunlit sea of New Providence is but 
a matter of a few short hours; and when reluctantly your face 
is set northward, it will be after you have said an revoir y not 
good by, for you will surely return. 

Nassau throws a spell around the traveller that sooner or 
later brings him back again. You may not know what the en¬ 
chantment is, but it works surely, certainly and pleasantly. 


Florida East Coast Steamship Line. 

MIAMI - - - - - - NASSAU 


Commencing January 15, steamships of this line will ply between Miami and Nassau, on the island of New Providence, among 
the Bahamas, only 145 miles distant. 4 

Semi-weekly trips are made during January, Tri-weekly during February and March, and Semi-weekly trips during April 
until the service terminates. 


For full particulars and actual sailing days and dates, consult time-tables of the FLORIDA EAST COAST RAILWAY. 











Royal Victoria Hotel, Nassau. 







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Queen Street, from Hill, Nassau. 
























































A Sponge Yard, Nassau. Reached by Steamer from Miami (145 miles only). 









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A Banana Garden, Nassau. 


Reached by Steamer from Miami (145 miles only). 

































































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Bird’s-Eye View of the City of Key West, Florida. 


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■ I ■ ■ CITY--' KEY WEST 




Steamer 


“City of Key West.” 

















































































































OPERATED BY THE FLORIDA 


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Steamships of this line make tri-weekly trips 
between Miami and Key West, 165 miles distant. 

The daylight run of ten hours in and out, 
among and along the Keys makes a most enjoy¬ 
able excursion through the thousands of islands 
called Keys which make the East Coast of South 
Florida vie with that of Maine for picturesque¬ 
ness and beauty, and brings one to that interest- 
ing island city and most important naval station 
of the United States. 

The island presents many pleasing features 
to the tourist, and is well worth a visit; tropical 
trees and flowers of all kinds abound, and the 
people of the island are remarkably hospitable. 
A constant breeze from the Atlantic Ocean and 
the proximity of the Gulf Stream render the 
climate equable and delightful. Frost never 
reaches here. During the winter of 1895, when 
the northern and middle portions of the peninsula 
of Florida suffered from the frost, the lowest 
■mperature at Key West was 54 degrees. Such 
K thing as artificial heat is unknown, except for 
cooking purposes. The capacious wharves of 


Steamship Co. 

AST COAST RAILWAY. 

* * * 

the city are daily lined with vessels of every 
nation, and the commodities of the world find 
an exchange here. The importance of Key West, 
as one of the greatest commercial centres of the 
country, is assured by its geographical position, 
and with the completion of the Nicaragua Canal 
it will occupy a still more prominent position in 
the commercial world. 

0O0000000 

Interesting Books 

Regarding the EAST COAST OF FLORIDA 

for sale at all Florida East Coast 
Hotel System News-Stands. 


IN BISCAYNE BAY.” 


By Caroline Washburn Rockwood. 


EAST FLORIDA ROMANCES.” 

By Caroline Washburn Rockwood. 


“HUNTING AND FISHING IN FLORIDA.” 



By Charles B. Corey. 




















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PAIN BEACH INN. 

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